Many women have forgotten the pill before

It may sound simple, but for some women remembering to take the pill every day is easier said than done. Whether you forgot your pill due to work, travel, family, or other distractions, we want you to know you're not alone. If you have forgotten to take the pill recently, here’s some support.

What should you do now?

Here is some brief advice on what to do if you have missed one or more pills.
FORGOT YOUR PILL? IT HAPPENS TO THE BEST OF US
FORGOT YOUR PILL? IT HAPPENS TO THE BEST OF US

Remain Calm

It's happened to many of us, so don’t panic if you forgot your pill. Although some pills will continue to work if you forgot to take just one or two, you may be at risk of getting pregnant, so it is important to speak to your healthcare professional.

Read Your Advice Leaflet

Consult the advice leaflet that came with your pills. It includes a lot of important information that will tell you what to do next.

Consult a Healthcare Professional

If you have missed more than one pill, or if you have questions that your advice leaflet can't answer, it's worth speaking to a healthcare professional. They will be able to provide you with advice on how to get your pill routine back on track or offer you advice on alternative methods of contraception.

 

If you had unprotected sex and are worried about an unplanned pregnancy, a healthcare professional can also advice you on emergency contraception. For further information on Emergency contraception please click here.

ALTERNATIVE CONTRACEPTION METHODS

It is important to choose a contraception that works for you. If you are unhappy with your contraception, there are plenty of other options to explore.

THE HORMONAL COIL

The Hormonal Coil is a small, soft T-shaped plastic frame that releases low levels of a progestogen hormone for up to 3 - 5 years. It is given with a prescription and placed in your womb by a doctor or nurse.

THE COPPER COIL

The Copper Coil is a small, T-shaped plastic frame that has a copper wire. It is available with a prescription and placed in your womb by a doctor or nurse, where it prevents pregnancy for up to 5 - 10 years.

THE CONTRACEPTIVE IMPLANT

A small, flexible silicone rod that releases hormones for up to 3 years. It is given with a prescription and placed under the skin of your upper arm by a doctor or nurse.

THE CONTRACEPTIVE INJECTION

An injection containing a hormone that is given with a prescription and administered by a doctor or nurse every 12-13 weeks.

NEED ADVICE? SPEAK TO YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL

Speak to a healthcare professional for advice and support on your contraceptive needs.

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